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HR Q & A – OSHA

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DOES AN OFFICE ENVIRONMENT NEED TO BE CONCERNED WITH ANY OSHA REGULATIONS?

Office safety is an effort to apply safety and health guidelines to the office environment in an attempt to reduce or eliminate the hazards for all employees who, during the course of their work, may be involved in a workplace accident or incident. Issues important to overall office safety, health, and wellness on the job, include ergonomics, hazard communication, slips, trips and falls, noise standards, stress, proper lifting, fire prevention, parking lot security, theft and workplace violence.

While there is no specific regulation covering office safety, there are a number of regulations which relate to it, such as 1910.1200 Hazard Communication, and 29 CFR 1910 Subpart D-Walking-Working Surfaces, among others.

All Employers Must:

  • Establish a training and information program for employees routinely exposed to hazardous chemicals in the workplace.
  • Ensure that a sufficient number of persons are trained to assist in the safe and orderly evacuation of the workplace in the event of emergency. These persons must also be able to account for or otherwise verify that all employees are in safe areas.

IF I OBTAIN EMPLOYEES FROM A TEMPORARY HELP SERVICE, EMPLOYEE LEASING SERVICE OR PERSONNEL SUPPLY SERVICE, DO I HAVE TO RECORD AN INJURY OR ILLNESS OCCURRING TO ONE OF THOSE EMPLOYEES ON THE OSHA 300 LOG?

You must record these injuries and illnesses if you supervise these employees on a day-today basis.

HOW DO I COUNT WEEKENDS, HOLIDAYS OR OTHER DAYS THE EMPLOYEE WOULD NOT HAVE WORKED ANYWAY ON THE OSHA 300 LOG?

You must count the number of calendar days the employee was unable to work as a result of the injury or illness, regardless of whether the employee was scheduled to work on those day(s). Weekend days, holidays, vacation days or other days off are included in the total number of days recorded if the employee would not have been able to work on those days because of a work-related injury or illness.